Stanley Greene’s Black Passport

- - Book Publishing

Book trailers seem like a great way to spread the word and sell books online. Here’s a good argument why:

“I think you can only keep positive for eight years. If you stay at it longer than that, you turn. And not into a beautiful butterfly.”

Black Passport Stanley Greene photographer Compiled by Teun van der Heijden

via, dvafoto

There Are 22 Comments On This Article.

  1. I am preparing to publish my first book of my poetry and photography. The book will also have a musical soundtrack to accompany the poems without a picture giving the reader a complete multimedia experience, instead of reading “just another” poetry book.

    We are living in a visual world, and print is dwindling right before our eyes. It may not be evident to most, but newspaper and magazine sales are at all time lows, and with the advent of readers like Barnes & Noble’ Nook, and Amazon’s Kindle, the book market will soon be on the same path.

    I think Mr. Greene should do the same thing using video as the medium, which would be extremely powerful.

    Thank you for sharing this video. I am looking forward to ordering Mr. Greene’s book, and perhaps I have tapped into a new way to think about photography?

    Kind Regards,
    Bryan J Zimmerman

  2. Certainly caught my attention. I would even consider buying the book if I had any money.

    I wonder how much time is invested in producing the video. Say a week at most? Put it online and let the people do the rest. The result is marketing at a direct audience with very little resources.

    The whole thing makes a lot of sense.

  3. WOW ! ! May be the best ‘net video I’ve seen. I’ll buy the book based on this, no need to hold the book and flip through the pages.

    Nice to see that someone really gets it. Visuals and sound working together to draw you in.

  4. Wow, great for Stanley. I love the concept and the feel of how this is presented, and I can hear the faint whine of wheels turning with photographers around the globe.
    Being a mostly analog guy who also appreciates the abundance of electronic options we have today, I love the marriage of darkroom prints/skype.
    I can only say I HOPE this isn’t the last book of darkroom prints, otherwise my book will never be published….
    I also like the fact he seems like a guy who just does his thing and has found a way to live in the “modern” photography world which seems to content with…with…with…just content.

  5. “…[it] gave me a great excuse. My wife has left me, instead of becoming an alcoholic, I would go and shoot war.”

    LOVE it!!!!

  6. Interesting thoughts and perspective. It struck me as a direct representation, the presence of his life, cold, empty, embattled yet there is still a b it of life present. It takes clarity to envision a compilation like this and cudos for following it Stanley.

    How many of us will follow the vision we have for a project this year and see it through to fruition? I printed a but for my family and self. he next later this year will be otherwise. Follow your passion!

  7. Wow. That’s powerful. I have an old copy of Sylvia Plachy’s “Unguided Tour” by Aperture. It came complete with a floppy LP soundtrack by Tom Waits that you’re supposed to while looking at the pictures.

  8. Rob, this is the best piece–as applicable to my rookie career–I have experienced on your site. Thank you for sharing.

    For those of us who are rookies at this photog thing, and who had the misfortune–or opportunity–to come in the worst market for photogs in its history, and who like me, have been forced by the simplest economic forces (pay rent, put food on our table, save to get a new lens) to do a lot more personal work than paying gigs to keep building and evolving, and because of those forces have been forced to go against the traditional specialized-field and diversify (I pay rent many times by shooting toilet paper for a cleaning products company), this piece is a raw and firm reminder to keep going, to stay true to one’s character and vision, to do whatever it takes to not just survive, but thrive.

    Thank you again.

  9. West Coast Jim

    Wow.
    Looks and sounds fun on a Eizo monitor and an iPhone.
    Very nice. But I’m a long time Tom Waits fanboy.
    As for the true significance we always have to remember that only history can be the judge. Most people think Reverie is the shit and perhaps if you sell DSLRs it is. But being first isn’t always being the best now is it? With the obvious exception of The Day the Earth Stood Still or the first Matrix!
    Just a caveat.
    I also remember round fisheyes, solarization, ringflashes and light painting fondly (but not often)…
    10-4

  10. Wow, I certainly hoped you killed enough feeling brain cells to detour you from your feelings of grief and saddness over losing your marriage. However…it most likely drove you deeper in to the abyss of nothingness! God forbid! Yep some times we just got to sit with those feelings..and if we cant feel…..well I guess we can go out and shoot dead people and really numb ourselves.
    It was an excellent presentation…but for something more uplifting….check my ‘good vibe’ photography on http://www.youtube.com/mimmyca. And this comes from a woman who wrote a tough book on letting go of a 22 year marriage called 2nd LIVES CLUB …why…Yes. there IS life after marriage..we just have to deal with the after math and be responsible for creating our own good feelings from here on out. Why? Because NOW we know…really know MARRIAGE and relationships ….come and go! Blessings!

  11. Absolutely riveting. Which is what it is meant to be. I’m getting started in multimedia like this {coming from just pure photos} and this is a great end of the spectrum.

  12. Janis Leventhal

    Wow Stanley – that ‘s a long way from the SF Art Institute. I remember you as Clare’s boyfriend – it is really wonderful to see your power. It’s been a lifetime since then. Congratulations, Janis