Readers Saw Print And Digital Versions As Distinct Entities Offering Different Experiences

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Stephen Quinn, publishing director of Vogue, said: “Where once it were imagined that digital might kill print, it has instead heightened the level of engagement the reader has with her magazine of choice.”

via Media Week.

There Are 7 Comments On This Article.

  1. Vogue and fashion magazines in general are some of the few left pouring money and creativity into editorials around the world. Maybe it’s partly because they were able to push aside the stale thinking of art directors and use style editors more. But it’s no wonder their readers still value print, and like digital too. It’s the content that matters.

  2. Mike Moss

    Maybe the future of print sales is going to be based on a magazine’s ability to appeal to the collector. Collectors are driven to purchase print in order to maintain hard-copy resources for their personal libraries. They have probably already seen the content online for free, but would still like to have a physical version of their favorites to add to personal collections. If the magazines can find ways to increase their appeal to collectors then they should have no problem converting print sales from online viewers.

  3. Though the market does not necessarily compare to that of times past, I do see a desire to own hard copies of certain, visually well produced magazines that are more akin to art books, such as Lürzer’s Archive, among others. The concepts incorporated into the front and back covers of WAD Magazine also set it apart in a way that I don’t see digital copies emulating.

  4. “Distinct Entities Offering Different Experiences”

    Definitely!
    Picked up a copy of the June issue of Wired while waiting in an office today.
    What a pleasure! First (paper) magazine I’ve read in awhile. The graphics and images only so-so, but reading the content on paper quite rewarding – picked up the same copy immediately.