If You Don’t Get Rejected Every Now And Then You Are Really Doing Something Wrong

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There is no end to rejection in art (or I suppose in life), no matter how “successful” a person might seem. I had a heck of a last year. Lost of prizes, lots of shows.  I’m sure from the outside it might look like I’m on top of the world…. and to some degree I am. Hard work paying off feels great. But the part I don’t advertise as much is that there is still, and I am certain always will be, plenty of getting rejected. They way I see if you don’t get rejected every now and then you are really doing something wrong. Your art must be boring. Or you have become complacent and aren’t trying to push things. I figure the best goal is to keep one upping your rejection. Try to get rejected from increasingly impressive things, grants, publications, institutions, people, etc.

via photographsonthebrain.com.

There Are 3 Comments On This Article.

  1. Nice one. Now I can find a way to take all the rejection as a challenge.

    I was trying to explain to someone the amount of rejection a photographer has to accept, and I couldn’t find a way to convey just how you deal with a 90% or higher rejection rate as just part of doing business.

  2. I love this. So true! I’m a fan of Project Runway, and I’ve noticed that ALL of the season winners are regularly on the chopping block in the weekly episodes–meaning, they are often one of the “last two standing”. These same people often also often WIN the weekly challenges. I think this is because they take risks and push things. It’s easy to float along and play it safe enough to stay in the game…but the contestants who end up winning the finals go all-out, taking brazen risks & showing designs that are truly innovative (even if the designs don’t always work & nearly get them axed). I see a slight similarity here–if your work is ALWAYS embraced…it means you’re playing it pretty safe. You’ll float along and stay in the game, but you’re NOT doing something that shakes people up and shows something in a new, innovative way. You’ll get work, but you won’t get the killer jobs; you’ll bring home blue and red ribbons, but you’ll never walk away with the Grand Prize Trophy.

  3. “I figure the best goal is to keep one upping your rejection. Try to get rejected from increasingly impressive things, grants, publications, institutions, people, etc.”

    Just another great example of how being a professional photographer in today’s highly competitive market is all about perspective – both in your photographs and in your business.