Art Producers Speak: Evan Lane

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Evan Lane. He is a fantastic photographer that can work in any environment. He is really professional, flexible and has a great attitude. He and his crew are a pleasure to work with.

Part of a personal series called Ambien. Those late night moments that feel like a waking dream. Los Angeles CA, 2014

Part of a personal series called Ambien. Those late night moments that feel like a waking dream.
Los Angeles CA, 2014

The beautiful Heather. I have shot her with long hair and with short hair and I’d shoot her any which way.

The beautiful Heather. I have shot her with long hair and with short hair and I’d shoot her any which way.

Calisthenics, with my friend Chelsea

Calisthenics, with my friend Chelsea

And I also love capturing those in between moments, the subject never thinks you are going to use.

And I also love capturing those in between moments, the subject never thinks you are going to use.

Nighttime conjures magic.

Nighttime conjures magic.

Best shots are the ones where they never even knew you were there.

Best shots are the ones where they never even knew you were there.

From an editorial I shot last month for Bright Ideas Magazine.

From an editorial I shot last month for Bright Ideas Magazine.

From an editorial I shot last month for Bright Ideas Magazine.

From an editorial I shot last month for Bright Ideas Magazine.

This is from a Toyota Prius campaign I shot for Saatchi.

This is from a Toyota Prius campaign I shot for Saatchi.

True love in Lake Havasu.

True love in Lake Havasu.

Lake Havasu, Arizona, 2014

Lake Havasu, Arizona, 2014

Lake Havasu, Arizona, 2014

Lake Havasu, Arizona, 2014

This is another one from the Toyota Prius campaign I shot for Saatchi.

This is another one from the Toyota Prius campaign I shot for Saatchi.

Set still from a music video for Artist, Emily Sundblad

Set still from a music video for Artist, Emily Sundblad

Artist, Emily Sundblad

Artist, Emily Sundblad

This tortoise was just chilling in the middle of the desert during my editorial shoot for Bright Ideas Magazine.

This tortoise was just chilling in the middle of the desert during my editorial shoot for Bright Ideas Magazine.

This is a print ad for the company I started, Langly Camera Bags. www.langly.co

This is a print ad for the company I started, Langly Camera Bags. www.langly.co

How many years have you been in business?
I have been shooting about 4 years professionally.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I went to Emerson College for film. Photography was self-taught out of necessity for instant gratification. Filmmaking is such a lengthy and layered process from start to finish.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
I’d say it was a culmination of things. After my parents split when I was 4, my mom dated artists and scientists. These people influenced and strengthened my natural curiosity. My dad was a film editor and taught me how to be frame accurate. My grandparents exposed me to cultural experiences and would take me to tons of galleries and museums. From those experiences I was able to learn how to form my own subjectivity for art, the composition, textures, color palates and subject matter. I think narrative film has had a huge impact on the way I approach photography and see it as another form of story telling.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
I will never stop leaning or evolving as an artist and foremost as a human being. I think it is important to stay excited about what interests me. On many levels I am a documentarian and I approach photography as a window into my life.   I think I get hired for this unique perspective as result.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
I think it just depends on the client. A lot of the times there are really pragmatic reasons for a client to intervene, the nature of a forcing ideas for practical reasons can definitely cause the final product to deviate from the personal vision they hired you for to begin with.

I think it just depends on the client. A lot of the times there are really pragmatic reasons for a client to intervene, the nature of a forcing ideas for practical reasons can definitely cause the final product to deviate from the personal vision they hired you for. I personally like the challenge of thinking outside of the box, inside of a box.
 
Other clients have less pressure from a large chain of command and hand over the reins. Those are usually the best shoots because the best relationships are ones built on trust. They want what they saw in your portfolio.

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
Of course there is the conventional way of getting out there, meeting art buyers and showing my book. I think it’s all about continually shooting new work, paid or not and then pushing that through social media. I have met a bunch of art buyers and art directors through Instagram. It’s a live-streamed portfolio that people are selectively subscribing to. It allows me to see how people react to my photos in an instant and on an almost subconscious level.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
If you stay true to your own personal vision, the ones who notice you are the ones who understand your work and see a place for it. You don’t find your audience, your audience finds you.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
I am always shooting for myself.

How often are you shooting new work?
2-3 days a week and I always have my camera on me.

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The work of LA-based photographer, Evan Lane, is unapologetically honest. His photography takes the form of a visual diary, documenting organic and relatable moments. The photos maintain that inherent effortlessness – breaths of life on pause. In 2012, Evan launched Langly to bridge the fashion and functionality of camera bags. Today, Langly can be seen on photographers on 5 continents and Evan can still be found on the road chasing down shots. If you need to get a hold of him, contact Dara at I Heart Reps.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Suzanne Sease

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