Posts by: A Photo Editor

Art Producers Speak: Lance Koudele

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Lance Koudele because in a large project he was able to handle every aspect with grace under fire. He was able to handle the unexpected and somehow found a way to capture the true essence of the project. His eye for beauty was something I have only had the pleasure of witnessing a few times in my career.

Shot from a campaign for Sensi Graves Bikinis. All of the ladies were professional athletes… awesome to work with females who have not only beauty but an incredibly powerful presence.

Shot from a campaign for Sensi Graves Bikinis. All of the ladies were professional athletes… awesome to work with females who have not only beauty but an incredibly powerful presence.

Photo of Phil Sullivan in Boston for a Life Is Good rebranding I recently shot with Straub Collaborative. Always awesome to work with a brand to help them redefine themselves.

Photo of Phil Sullivan in Boston for a Life Is Good rebranding I recently shot with Straub Collaborative. Always awesome to work with a brand to help them redefine themselves.

Ryan Huggins atop Illumination Rock on Mt Hood, shot for Native Eyewear. The snowboard descent under starlight and sliver of moon was magical.

Ryan Huggins atop Illumination Rock on Mt Hood, shot for Native Eyewear. The snowboard descent under starlight and sliver of moon was magical.

Cloud break in Tengboche Nepal. This portrait for WEND magazine is of TREW clothing co-founder Chris Pew, it was one of the only cloud breaks we enjoyed on our 3 week trip there.

Cloud break in Tengboche Nepal. This portrait for WEND magazine is of TREW clothing co-founder Chris Pew, it was one of the only cloud breaks we enjoyed on our 3 week trip there.

Owen Leeper launches- Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The mountains have been the source of my creativity for the last 25 years. Nothing gives me more stoke than a steep canvas of untracked snow. “Snow Spoken” a self published photo journal will be released this fall.

Owen Leeper launches- Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The mountains have been the source of my creativity for the last 25 years. Nothing gives me more stoke than a steep canvas of untracked snow. “Snow Spoken” a self published photo journal will be released this fall.

Taken from Beach Life. A self produced project.

Taken from Beach Life. A self produced project.

Stand Up Paddle-boarder shot for Slingshot SUP. I am a fan of the underside of bridges. So many people never take the time to explore what lies under them. Each bridge is an opportunity for adventure.

Stand Up Paddle-boarder shot for Slingshot SUP. I am a fan of the underside of bridges. So many people never take the time to explore what lies under them. Each bridge is an opportunity for adventure.

Mountain Biker. Taken from a series of portraits of downhill racers.

Mountain Biker. Taken from a series of portraits of downhill racers.

Dutch Red Bull athlete Ruben Lenten. Like herding cats this one… very enjoyable and one of my dearest friends in the world of kiteboarding, something I’ve shot a lot of over the years.

Dutch Red Bull athlete Ruben Lenten. Like herding cats this one… very enjoyable and one of my dearest friends in the world of kiteboarding, something I’ve shot a lot of over the years.

Friendship Glacier British Columbia. Campaign for HydroFlask. We were airlifted to a remote hut for a week without running water or electricity to self access ski tour the surrounding mountains.

Friendship Glacier British Columbia. Campaign for HydroFlask. We were airlifted to a remote hut for a week without running water or electricity to self access ski tour the surrounding mountains.

Travel piece shot for Men’s Journal- Isabella Caves, Puerto Rico.

Travel piece shot for Men’s Journal- Isabella Caves, Puerto Rico.

How many years have you been in business?
8 years.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
Well, both… I went to the Art Institute of Portland and studied Digital Media. I really twisted the curriculum to study the things I wanted- sound, photography, especially film. After graduation I soon found doors kept opening for photography so I rolled with it. When issues arose along the way I problem solved, and figured it out myself.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
I think initially it was the people that truly live the subject they shoot- the Buddhist Matthieu Ricard, adventure work of Jimmy Chin and the mountain culture of Jordan Manley. It also was the people that capture the lifestyle- Daniel Blom, Chris Burkard. Lately I’ve been inspired by the more fashion travel lifestyle work of Misha Taylor.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
I never set the intention to do something to be noticed. I want the subject to be noticed, it’s not about me. I want people to experience a place and moment that they normally never would. I want them to be inspired to explore. I also want a sense of fun to radiate into the viewer… a sense of empowerment that there is a life much deeper than the one they are told of on TV.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
Sometimes, but like any collaboration there is give and take. I always push the boundaries when I think it necessary, it always seems to be appreciated in the end.

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
I recently enlisted the help of Amanda Sosa Stone and a brilliant boutique marketing agency based out of Portland Oregon called Owen Jones and Partners. We just rolled out a new website and I’ll be following it up with a direct marketing campaign this summer.

What I am finding is when I fly out to Boston, LA or NYC to work people instantly notice my vibe is different. I live in Jackson Wyoming in the winter and Hood River Oregon in the summer and that’s refreshing to them. New bookings happen with them as a result. I really like meeting face to face with people and hope to do more of that once the summer shooting season slows to show my work.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
I think it’s important to show what you want to shoot. Show what you like. Show the story of who you are. Those authentic images hold the most magic.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
Yes, I find the more I shoot the more creatively inspired I am to shoot. It goes hand in hand. Living in two locations keeps me going and grounded as well. The Pacific Ocean and Teton Mountains are powerful places.

How often are you shooting new work?
Weekly.

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Lance Koudele is an American photographer born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. His early adult years were shaped by his experiences as an extreme snowboard athlete, traveling and riding mountain regions and deserted surf breaks across the globe.

Those that know him will tell you he is naturally full of peace and compassion. It was no accident that his ease of connecting personally compelled him to begin to combine people and place. His talent for capturing the magic that happens when the two come together form the foundation of his growing career.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

I Let The Life Come To The Picture: The Accidents, The Things That Happen By Chance

- - Blog News

When I’m having a shoot, in the morning the model is arriving from the hotel, the hairdresser is coming from London, a lot of different moods – one is happy, one is crying, one is angry, one is – I don’t know what – sleeping. And even if you have a precise idea of what you want to do, you can’t. Everyone is coming in with all this different energy and you have to deal with them. So you never know what you’ll do in the end. And this I like. I like the accidents, the things that happen by chance. I let the life come to the picture and the creativity flow.

via Paolo Roversi Interview | The Talks.

Art Producers Speak: Sean Murphy

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Sean Murphy. Sean is tenacious at living. He is vibrant, happy with an eye of the finest artist. Each of his takes makes me say AH! and I am an artist, so that’s not always an easy thing. He goes anywhere and traveling in his giant truck, he becomes part of the culture of what he is shooting and it shows.

Monterey Tourism / Cramer-Kresselt

Monterey Tourism / Cramer-Kresselt

47 Brand / The Fantastical

47 Brand / The Fantastical

Personal trip to Nicaragua

Personal trip to Nicaragua

SRT / The Richards Group

SRT / The Richards Group

Tosin Abasi / Guitar World

Tosin Abasi / Guitar World

Stock shoot for Image Source

Stock shoot for Image Source

Cedar Fair / Cramer-Kresselt

Cedar Fair / Cramer-Kresselt

Evan Seinfeld

Evan Seinfeld

Nature's Recipe / Draft

Nature’s Recipe / Draft

AAA / The Richards Group

AAA / The Richards Group

How many years have you been in business?
Well, I got out of college in 1993. It was around 1995 that I started getting my first jobs, which at that time were mostly editorial. I knew a lot of bands, so I also ended up shooting rock and roll and album covers. I didn’t get my first advertising job until 1999, but by 2000 it became and remains the primary work that I do. I still do shoot music and editorial and I love the creative freedom it brings, but I don’t focus my energy on acquiring that work so much anymore. So, that’s the “too long” answer…it’s been about 20 years. :)

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
School. I spent a lot of time painting and sculpting while I was growing up. I had a girlfriend with an old Pentax that she loaned me and, on a whim, I signed up for a photo class at a community college in Orlando, Florida. I got the bug immediately, quit mid-semester, and moved to Boston to go to the New England School of Photography. I graduated Valedictorian in 1993.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
Before I went to Boston, I attended that photography class in Orlando. The teacher was a retired Time-Life photographer. His hands were gnarled from years of working with the chemicals. Cool guy. He said to me, “I never say this, but you have something special. If I were you, I’d leave here and go to Boston or New York.” So I did. Within a month, I was gone.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
Well, for starters, I’m shooting ALL the time. I surround myself with uber-talented people. I get fueled by their vibes. And I have a crew of crazy, crazy-talented friends. They’re always keeping me laughing and I’m always inspired. So ultimately, I’m just photographing my life. I’m just grateful that who and what’s around me happens to be interesting.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
Hmm, I don’t know if I really get that direct input from the client. The creatives are acting as the intermediary.

I present my work as I see fit on my website and on social media.

Frequently, I’ll be asked by the creatives to put together a selection of work or a special presentation that they can show to the clients. If the client approves, I guess I get hired. Lately, I’m having the most fun in my career I’ve ever had. I’m getting hired to shoot exactly what I love to shoot. :)

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
As far as the internet is concerned: website/blog, Facebook, and Instagram. The usual suspects.

My primary engagement from the buying audience comes from my website, with Facebook coming a close second.

I travel a great deal. When I do, I always make arrangements to meet art buyers and creatives all across the country.

I’ll do a mailer a few times a year, and I also have books made of my work that I’ll bring with me to show to prospective clients.

Lately, I’ve been getting more attention for some of my rock and roll photography from years past, which is now going to be shown in some galleries, so that is also another new avenue that is exposing my work.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
You need to show a cohesive body of work. I’ve found that that’s more impressive to the buyer than trying to show your entire bag of tricks. You want to create a relation of your name to the type of work you are selling yourself to do. You want them to say “Sean” or “this guy” can do this type of work. You don’t want to show a thousand styles.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
Non-stop. I shoot everyday. I don’t leave the house without my camera strapped around my back. I’m not doing it on purpose to keep myself fresh. I’m doing it because I love it so much.

How often are you shooting new work?
Pretty much all the time. If I’m not shooting paid work, I’m busy lining up pro-bono shoots for companies that I find interesting, working with new super creative art directors, working on collaborations with other artists, or shooting new material for stock with Getty. So my time is always busy. I’m not motivated by the money. I’m just motivated by shooting cool stuff all the time. :)

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Over a decade later, Sean is now internationally known for creating influential, diverse award-winning campaigns for clients such as Ford, Chevy, Old Navy, Playstation, Wal-Mart and Hard Rock Café – and he’s always on time and within budgets, even when they seem unrealistic. He has also shot album covers for bands like Weezer and Tenacious D. Sean is universally recognized for his approachability with his subjects. From kids to celebrities, businessmen to bikers, everyone is at home with Sean’s larger-than-life personality, and that comfort level brings out the best in people.

www.seanmurphyphoto.com
Represented by Tom Zumpano 310-409-0249 tom@zumpanos.com

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

 

Frere-Jones and Hoefler

- - Working

Sadly, found this amazing video because of this:

In January, Frere-Jones filed a lawsuit against Hoefler, saying that their company was not actually a partnership, but a long con in which Hoefler had tricked him into signing over the rights to all of his work, cheating Frere-Jones out of his half of the business. “In the most profound treachery and sustained exploitation of friendship, trust and confidence, Hoefler accepted all the benefits provided by Frere-Jones while repeatedly promising Frere-Jones that he would give him the agreed equity, only to refuse to do so when finally demanded,” the complaint charges. Frere-Jones is asking a court to grant him $20 million.

via, spd.org.

Cindy Sherman on James Franco: ‘I Don’t Know That I Can Say It’s Art’

- - Blog News

James Franco’s recent appropriation of her acclaimed “Untitled Film Stills” series, which raised more than a few eyebrows when it debuted at Pace Gallery a few days earlier. “I was flattered, I can only be flattered,” she said with a slight sigh. “I don’t know that I can say it’s art, but I think it’s weirder that Pace would show them than that he would make them.”

via Cindy Sherman on James Franco: ‘I Don’t Know That I Can Say It’s Art’ | Gallerist.

New York Times Wins Two Photography Pulitzers

- - Blog News

The New York Times has swept the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for photography. The staff photographer Tyler Hicks won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in breaking news photography for his coverage of a terrorist attack at an upscale mall in Nairobi, Kenya, that left more than 60 people dead. Josh Haner was awarded the Pulitzer in feature photography for his images of the slow and painful recovery process for a survivor of the Boston Marathon bombing.

via New York Times Wins Two Photography Pulitzers.

I Can’t Do One Damn Thing Without The Love And Support Of My Wife

- - Blog News

I’m just a dude taking pictures. I appreciate the amazing opportunities that come my way but I don’t really enjoy being in the spotlight. I’m not trying to be anyone’s idol. That’s for sure. The fact of the matter is I can’t do one damn thing without the love and support of my wife. She is my better 7/8ths. When I’m sitting at a table listening to Joe McNally tell stories and share his experiences, she’s at home folding laundry. When I’m hoping and praying that I get an upgrade to business class, she’s getting four kids to four different schools in the morning. When I’m out with a camera in my hand, her piano sits dormant.

via GPP Shootout :: A Story For My Wife · DEDPXL.

Art Producers Speak: Therese + Joel

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Therese + Joel as they are a great team and the one’s to keep an eye on!

Portrait of pop singer Betty Who for Out Magazine's "The Young and Restless" Musician Portfolio.

Portrait of pop singer Betty Who for Out Magazine’s “The Young and Restless” Musician Portfolio.

Victoria's Secret Model Elsa Hosk channeling Nancy Sinatra for Galore Mag's "Women Who Rock" issue.

Victoria’s Secret Model Elsa Hosk channeling Nancy Sinatra for Galore Mag’s “Women Who Rock” issue.

Campaign for FLKLR Surf, shot at Rockaway Beach, New York.

Campaign for FLKLR Surf, shot at Rockaway Beach, New York.

Portrait of the actress and filmmaker Greta Gerwig shot for TIME Magazine. It was also named one of TIME's Best Portraits of 2013

Portrait of the actress and filmmaker Greta Gerwig shot for TIME Magazine.
It was also named one of TIME’s Best Portraits of 2013

We were commissioned by TIME Magazine to document New York Fashion week. This is one of our favorite photographs, shot at the Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter 2013 show. The image depicts models walking towards a large indoor "sun" installed at the venue, referencing artist Ólafur Elíasson's weather project.

We were commissioned by TIME Magazine to document New York Fashion week. This is one of our favorite photographs, shot at the Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter 2013 show. The image depicts models walking towards a large indoor “sun” installed at the venue, referencing artist Ólafur Elíasson’s weather project.

One of our favorite photographs of model Sara Blomqvist, included in our personal series "On Leaving".

One of our favorite photographs of model Sara Blomqvist, included in our personal series “On Leaving”.

Fashion editorial for Revs Magazine, shot in Lidingö, Sweden.

Fashion editorial for Revs Magazine, shot in Lidingö, Sweden.

Campaign for womenswear label Skotison. We absolutely loved the concept of the collection: B-list horror movies, The Cramps and goths at the beach.

Campaign for womenswear label Skotison. We absolutely loved the concept of the collection: B-list horror movies, The Cramps and goths at the beach.

Personal work, from the series "Three Graces", photographed in Sweden.

Personal work, from the series “Three Graces”, photographed in Sweden.

A very recent portrait of director Woody Allen, together with theatre director and choreographer Susan Stroman for TIME Magazine, shot at the St. James Theatre in New York City.

A very recent portrait of director Woody Allen, together with theatre director and choreographer Susan Stroman for TIME Magazine, shot at the St. James Theatre in New York City.

How many years have you been in business?
About four years now. 

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
We met while both studying at Parsons in Paris and later transferred over to Parsons the New School of Design in New York, from where we graduated.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
Therese was very influenced by her mother, who is a photographer. Joel doesn’t have one exact source of inspiration; the fascination for storytelling has been there as far as he can remember – it has just perhaps changed mediums over the range of years from written to visual. However, the greatest inspiration for both of us must be film - early European cinema, great minds like Ingmar Bergman, Carl Theodor Dreyer, Douglas Sirk, the melodrama of film noir, our similar taste in music (power ballads, italo disco), as well as 90s masterpieces like Twin Peaks, and Tim Burton’s Catwoman – tragic pop culture icons.

We were also heavily influenced by our Nordic surroundings – Therese grew up in Stockholm, Sweden, and Joel in Finnish Lapland. Even if a bit of a cliché, the pitch-black, arctic surroundings have definitely played a great influence on us. 

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
Perhaps it’s not so much about staying fresh and/or following trends – we rather try to do what we find interesting, inspiring and beautiful. 

Since we are two it is important for us to discuss and communicate our ideas with one another. It is helpful though that we share a lot of interests, but also important to disagree at times to challenge each other. Usually one of us comes up with something they find inspiring, and the other one takes it to another level. In that way, we complete each other’s sentences. 

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
Communication is truly key, as well as staying true to your vision and doing what you do best – not trying to mimic something else to become more accessible. That being said, it is of course important to stay flexible. And occasionally art buyers or creatives find our darker work the most interesting, but have a difficult time to convince the client to go for something less mainstream. 

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
Editorial work has been very important for us in approaching different and larger audiences.

We find social media to be extremely helpful: Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr. Not only just to get our work out there, but also for other reasons like casting for example. We also find that social media makes us more accessible; it’s a great way to interact, as well as to show our process.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
Understand your audience. Taste varies, but it’s really hard to get away from bad editing – sequencing your book appropriately is a crucial step in storytelling. 

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
We work when we are not working: personal projects are incredibly important to us. We find it very helpful to our creative process to constantly produce new work – not only to try out new things, but also keep exceeding at what we do.

How often are you shooting new work?
As often as possible - commissioned work keeps us very busy, but we try to shoot at least one new personal project every month.

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Therese Öhrvall and Joel Jägerroos are a Swedish-Finnish photography team. They live and work in New York City.

Therese + Joel’s work has been exhibited internationally, including The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, New Mexico, The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia, Krasnoyarsk State Museum in Siberia, Milk Gallery & F.L.O.A.T. Gallery in New York City, Gallery S. Bensimon in Paris, France and Ricoh Ring Cube Gallery in Tokyo, Japan.

Their clients include TIME Magazine, Wired, REVS, The Wall Street Journal, The Times, S Magazine, Out Magazine, FLATT Magazine, Milk Made, Galore Mag, IVANAHelsinki, Bullett Magazine and New York Post, amongst others.

Therese + Joel were selected as one of the 30 emerging photographers to watch in 2011 by Photo District News. Their photo of Greta Gerwig was named as one of TIME’s Best Portraits of 2013.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Emotionally I want to try and stop the theft, but logically I think it is probably better for one’s career to go for the visibility.

- - Blog News

…when your images are stolen, I suspect there really isn’t that much damage done financially to individual photographers (hey…don’t flame me for saying that), though collectively there sure is a lot of money being left on the table! Ultimately, if someone steals the image I get nothing, if they don’t steal I get nothing, but if they share it there may be profit for me in increased links, web traffic and visibility.

via The Stock Photo Guy – John Lund Stock Photographer: Watermarks, Theft And Visibility.

This Week In Photography Books: Osamu James Nakagawa

by Jonathan Blaustein

I could never live in Portland. (No offense.)

Setting aside my distaste for humorless hipsters, it would never happen: there’s just not enough sun. I don’t care if they have the best coffee in the world, and a beautiful girl in chunky glasses fitted me with an IV drip that dosed me with caffeine, constantly, day in and day out.

It just wouldn’t work.

Why? Because I’m addicted to sunshine. Without a near-daily fix of Vitamin D, I become as surly and listless as a drunk walrus. Like today, for instance.

We get 330 days of sunshine a year here in Northern New Mexico, but come April, the high clouds move in and the wind whips more fiercely than Harrison Ford practicing for Indiana Jones Part 5. (Note to Mr. Ford: ditch the silly earring, and we might take you seriously again.) As I write this, it’s actually snowing outside, and my bones are colder than Han Solo’s blood when he shoots Greedo in the Star Wars bar scene.

As such, I would not have fared well in the old days. I mean the very, very old days, when humans lived in caves, taking protection wherever they could find it. Bears, saber-toothed tigers, homicidal assholes from other tribes, all could cause trouble, if you weren’t careful. So the dark became associated with safety. Dank air was precious, as it represented home.

Occasionally, fast forwarding millennia, there comes a time when people retreat back to those old ways. Deep within natural fissures in the Earth, one can hide for a long while, provided food and water are stockpiled, or, at least, available. (Fresh water in underground streams, and plenty of barbecued rats. Deeee-licious.)

Such a situation occurred during World War II, on the island of Okinawa, in Japan. We’ve seen photos of the place in this very column, as I reviewed a book by Daido Moriyama a couple of years ago. (Yes, that was the book where I mistakenly called him a woman. I only bring it up so you don’t have to.)

Then, we saw things above ground, and witnessed the remnants of American occupation. Burger joints, in particular. (As cows undoubtedly taste better than rodents, when cooked carefully above an open flame.)

Today, though, we’ll burrow beneath the island cliffs, and enter a world not meant to be seen by cameras, which so dearly love the light. Osamu James Nakagawa is our guide, and his book, “Gama Caves,” published by Akaaka, is our opportunity.

I didn’t intend to go on a run of Pacific Rim photo books, but there you have it. Like I said last week, show me something I’ve never seen before, and I’m likely to pontificate here and now.

The caves were utilized during the War, and many civilians called the Gama home, along with military types. I can’t imagine anyone had any fun down there, and according to the text, Americans used all sorts of killing techniques to either root the people out, or destroy them where they were. Flame throwers, bombs, all sorts of nasty endings for the people who fled to the seeming safety of stalactites and mites. (Never could keep those two words straight.)

These pictures are haunting and beautiful and horrific and awesome. My favorite kind of art, the type that hits all notes together. Ironically, they were on the wall in Houston when I visited FotoFest in 2012, but I didn’t know they were there, as I was holed up in the metaphorical cave known as a portfolio review.

I’m fairly certain you’ll like these pictures, though my snapshots don’t do the subtlety justice. The writing within, in Japanese and English, is uniformly excellent. There’s a poem with the obligatory reference to pubic hair, and a few essays, including one by the legendary MFA,H curator Anne Wilkes Tucker. I believe the artist received a Guggenheim fellowship to support the project, so the high-art-street-cred will likely back up the value of your purchase, should you choose to buy the book.

To continue with all the cinematic references, I heard they’re re-making Mad Max with a less racist, homophobic, Anti-Semitic protagonist. That’s the big fear we all have, right? (Especially when you have kids.) That we’re ruining the world, and our descendants will live in a post-apocalyptic nightmare, where many will be forced underground again.

I’m guessing the artist is smart enough to know that metaphor will pop up in your mind, as it has in mine. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that. OK?

Bottom Line: Creepy photos inside Okinawan caves

To Purchase ”Gama Caves” Visit Photo-Eye

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Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Art Producers Speak: Josh DeHonney

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Josh DeHonney. I’m a big fan of his work. One of our favorite portrait photographers who is exceedingly nice guy who I praise his humbleness when he is praised for his craft.

I love radio, and I love New York.  So shooting Ty Bentli of CBS 92.3 all around the city was a great commission.  Ty was new to the city but felt very at home there, and we wanted to convey that.  We had planned to take that standard picture of him waiting for the train as it rushed by, shutter open.  As we waited, I turned the camera away from him and for a moment he relaxed and leaned on the pole naturally.

I love radio, and I love New York.  So shooting Ty Bentli of CBS 92.3 all around the city was a great commission.  Ty was new to the city but felt very at home there, and we wanted to convey that.  We had planned to take that standard picture of him waiting for the train as it rushed by, shutter open.  As we waited, I turned the camera away from him and for a moment he relaxed and leaned on the pole naturally.

The London Souls, a rock band from New York, used this image as the cover art for their sophomore record, Here Come The Girls.  We had great chemistry, like we went to high school together.  The album looks -- and sounds -- great.

The London Souls, a rock band from New York, used this image as the cover art for their sophomore record, Here Come The Girls.  We had great chemistry, like we went to high school together.  The album looks — and sounds — great.

I took this shot on the train tracks behind the client’s warehouse … without permission.  I lost my wallet making this one happen.  Two weeks later, I get a call from the Kearny Rail Police.  The good news was, they found my wallet.  The bad news was, they weren’t happy I was on the tracks.  Luckily the ad had printed by then, so I had more than a business card to back up my story.  I got away with it this time.  But next time, I’m told it’s going to cost me $10,000! 

I took this shot on the train tracks behind the client’s warehouse … without permission.  I lost my wallet making this one happen.  Two weeks later, I get a call from the Kearny Rail Police.  The good news was, they found my wallet.  The bad news was, they weren’t happy I was on the tracks.  Luckily the ad had printed by then, so I had more than a business card to back up my story.  I got away with it this time.  But next time, I’m told it’s going to cost me $10,000! 

Bucks Life magazine sent me to cover a young new DJ (then still in high school). He was making some cool events happen, all for charity.  We met at the Jersey shore in the summer and got this great shot in a matter of minutes.

Bucks Life magazine sent me to cover a young new DJ (then still in high school). He was making some cool events happen, all for charity.  We met at the Jersey shore in the summer and got this great shot in a matter of minutes.

I met Mac Miller by Union Square.  We walked over to Irving Plaza together, where he was performing that night.  As we got close to the venue, I noticed Mac getting his game face on.  He turned his hat around, zipped his jacket, and pulled up his pants.  When we rounded the corner, there were a dozen fans waiting for him, as he knew there would be.  The kids went crazy for him.  He was cool as hell.  He took the time to take pictures with each kid.  It was great to capture that.

I met Mac Miller by Union Square.  We walked over to Irving Plaza together, where he was performing that night.  As we got close to the venue, I noticed Mac getting his game face on.  He turned his hat around, zipped his jacket, and pulled up his pants.  When we rounded the corner, there were a dozen fans waiting for him, as he knew there would be.  The kids went crazy for him.  He was cool as hell.  He took the time to take pictures with each kid.  It was great to capture that.

This image is another good example of an instant where the subject feels totally comfortable.  In this case, Director Ulysses Terrero was standing behind me, where the director normally stands.  Although I had my camera metered for the strobes in the background, there was enough ambient light available to cut the wizard and still get a great exposure when I turned to grab this shot.

This image is another good example of an instant where the subject feels totally comfortable.  In this case, Director Ulysses Terrero was standing behind me, where the director normally stands.  Although I had my camera metered for the strobes in the background, there was enough ambient light available to cut the wizard and still get a great exposure when I turned to grab this shot.

This commission took me all the way to Hawaii to shoot a look book and some ads.  Beautiful girl, cool clothes, and a tropical island.  You can't miss.

This commission took me all the way to Hawaii to shoot a look book and some ads.  Beautiful girl, cool clothes, and a tropical island.  You can’t miss.

I have contributed to Urban Latino magazine for years.  I love making awesome images happen for them.  When John Leguizamo came up as a cover option, I was extra excited.  One of my favorite actors, John was a total pleasure to photograph and could not have been more humble.

I have contributed to Urban Latino magazine for years.  I love making awesome images happen for them.  When John Leguizamo came up as a cover option, I was extra excited.  One of my favorite actors, John was a total pleasure to photograph and could not have been more humble.

When I left NYC in 2011, I couldn't help noticing the growing number of vacant properties around me.  This is from a series of images of massive abandoned buildings within ten miles from my house.

When I left NYC in 2011, I couldn’t help noticing the growing number of vacant properties around me.  This is from a series of images of massive abandoned buildings within ten miles from my house.

This is one of my good friends taking a break while we were shooting on location in LaQuinta, California.

This is one of my good friends taking a break while we were shooting on location in LaQuinta, California.

Before linking up with the band Brother to shoot a portrait for YRB magazine, I checked out their video for "Darling Buds of May."  I was really impressed.  I chose a location that was inspired by the video, hoping to keep the band’s image consistent while shooting with a style that comes naturally to me.

Before linking up with the band Brother to shoot a portrait for YRB magazine, I checked out their video for “Darling Buds of May.”  I was really impressed.  I chose a location that was inspired by the video, hoping to keep the band’s image consistent while shooting with a style that comes naturally to me.

Spike Lee was my first professional portrait assignment in NYC.  He’s a legend, of course.  So no pressure.  We shot this at NYU, where he’s a film professor.  The story I shot the pictures for was about sneakers.  So that made the experience that much more fun.

Spike Lee was my first professional portrait assignment in NYC.  He’s a legend, of course.  So no pressure.  We shot this at NYU, where he’s a film professor.  The story I shot the pictures for was about sneakers.  So that made the experience that much more fun.

As a big fan of Bobbito Garcia, this early shoot for Kicksclusive magazine really stands out for me.  Bob is one the coolest dudes ever and also a photographer.  I can't front for one second.  This shot was all his idea.  I simply executed.

As a big fan of Bobbito Garcia, this early shoot for Kicksclusive magazine really stands out for me.  Bob is one the coolest dudes ever and also a photographer.  I can’t front for one second.  This shot was all his idea.  I simply executed.

This is a selection from a series called Watching.  I aimed to capture the presence of the growing number of security cameras in the public space.  I had no intention of photographing the guy who blocked his face from my camera … the irony.

This is a selection from a series called Watching.  I aimed to capture the presence of the growing number of security cameras in the public space.  I had no intention of photographing the guy who blocked his face from my camera … the irony.

As far as easy and amazing assignments go, The Ting Tings take the cake.

As far as easy and amazing assignments go, The Ting Tings take the cake.

I was so thrilled to photograph Esperanza Spalding.  She was very cool, easy to work with, and personifies Jazz.

I was so thrilled to photograph Esperanza Spalding.  She was very cool, easy to work with, and personifies Jazz.

When Natalia Kills showed up at the studio for a portrait session, I knew we were going to make some cool images happen.  We had instant chemistry and came up with a few solid concepts right away.  Narrowing the edits down was as tough as expected.  This image didn't make the print book.  But it really stood out.

When Natalia Kills showed up at the studio for a portrait session, I knew we were going to make some cool images happen.  We had instant chemistry and came up with a few solid concepts right away.  Narrowing the edits down was as tough as expected.  This image didn’t make the print book.  But it really stood out.

How many years have you been in business?
For years I worked as an assistant and at Pier 59 Studios in New York while simultaneously building my brand. But in 2010, I quit assisting and have since focused on my own work full time. As much as I loved assisting and working at the Pier as a side hustle, it’s great to be shooting on my own.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
A little of both. School gave me the fundamentals. But I also learned a lot on the job and by being around world-class photographers on a near-daily basis at the Pier. Also, the Pier used to let employees test once a month for free. I took full — and I mean full — advantage of that deal. Between that and my assisting work, I was able to shoot and test a ton. Studio photography is amazing. It’s an important skill to develop. All of the techniques and lighting tricks you learn are universally applied when you don’t have the luxury of a fully-stocked equipment room.

Also, packing jobs for remote locations, where there are no stores, let alone EQ rooms, teaches you the importance of triple-checking. You can never take anyone’s word on equipment that you didn’t see. And sometimes going without it is not an option. No art school can teach you pragmatic things like that.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
My mom always stressed the importance of doing what you love, no matter what. She travelled the world taking pictures for fun. Though she chose a stable career as a dental hygienist, her pictures covered the walls. She is also a long-time subscriber and avid collector of National Geographic. Those magazines were major influences. And for years I assisted Kip Meyer, who is an awesome photographer. I really admire the way he interacts with clients and models as well as his general approach to projects.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
Inspiration is the easy part. Being inspired is a prerequisite for the job. I get ideas for pictures from the imagery I see all around me. I drive a lot, ride my bike a lot. I find inspiration in that. I can’t help but notice amazing landscapes, or an interesting building, even if I can’t shoot them. Then I imagine what I see as context for a subject. So when I arrive at a location for a client sight unseen and have to make an interesting image happen no matter what, I have a whole catalog of ideas in my mind to draw on.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
It seems the work that gets the best response from creatives and peers isn’t always what appeals to a client’s target audience. Just because an image or series of work is cool on tumblr, or gets a bunch of Likes, doesn’t mean it will sell.  The most important thing about photography is being creative.  But with commercial work, you have to consider the client’s goals.  I am providing a service, and incorporating what the client has in mind is the most important thing. I still try to be sure you can see my thumbprint on the final product, since the client chose me to make the image, after all.

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
I have a show at the end of April to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Urban Latino magazine. I’m the photo editor of ULM. I’ve worked with them for years. The show will highlight the work I have done for the magazine. I also stay up on social media as much as I can. And I’ve been known to cold call brands that I love and want to work with. I also love to make new connections through editorial work. But what usually works best is sticking with the network I know.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
Being a photographer is a lot like being a writer. Great writers have a very clear voice. That’s how you distinguish yourself from the crowd. I love looking at other photographer’s work, taking in as many photo books, blogs, and magazines as I can. This process helps me find my voice. So look at as many pictures you can. Know the landscape. Look at your own work all the time, too. Be sure your images speak to your vision. Know what you want to shoot. Be very clear in your mind what it is you want to see before you make it happen. As with all other art forms, there are lots of trends, but honesty never gets old.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
Always. One of my favorite things about location shooting is that you have to get an idea of where you are shooting by walking around, and of course you are going to bring your camera. So at that moment, it’s nice to relax and imagine that you are just out in the park, shooting pictures with no pressure, and there is no art director 10 yards away stressing because it’s overcast or the model is late.

Also, I have two young children who are changing by the second — it’s amazing to see them grow. I want make sure that I am changing and developing, too. I don’t want to take the same pictures my whole life. That just doesn’t make sense.

How often are you shooting new work?
At least 3 times a week. In the summer, almost every day. Photography is built into my life. There is always a camera in arm’s reach.

Josh was born in Toronto and grew up in nearby Oshawa. He relocated to New York in 2000, where he was on the grind until 2011. Josh now resides just outside of the city with his wife, Melissa, and their two photo assistants-in-training, Jalen (3) and Janessa (1).

http://joshdehonney.com
jd@joshdehonney.com

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Reuters maintains dogged silence on allegations of ‘staged images’

- - Blog News

When contacted by BJP, Reuters refused, numerous times, to share the specific details of the internal investigation it says it conducted after The New York Times first contacted the news agency three months ago. It also declined to clarify when that investigation took place and who took part in it.

When asked whether Khatib still worked for Reuters, the news agency refused to comment.

When asked whether the recent allegations had resulted in a change in Reuters’ news-gathering practices in Syria, the news agency refused to comment.

When asked whether Reuters would consider opening another investigation following the recent and specific allegations against its news operations in Syria, the news agency refused to comment.

And, more importantly, when asked why Reuters had been using Syrian activists as freelance photographers without informing its clients, the news agency again refused to comment.

via British Journal of Photography.

Let’s Dispel The Notion That Commercial Photographers Have A Camera In Their Hands Every Day

- - Blog News

First, let’s dispel the notion that commercial photographers have a camera in their hands every day. This will vary for individuals, and by season, but I would guess that I spend a good 75-80% of my working hours in front of a computer – not out shooting. I consider that to be a pretty successful ratio. No one starting out really thinks about it, but digital workflow, retouching, billing, marketing, pre-production, post-production, accounting, taxes, etc… and the plethora of general business paperwork takes up a ton of time.

via The Definitive Guide to Starting a Successful Photography Business – Houston Tx Advertising Photographer Robert Seale.

For Me Shooting Still Images And Motion Simultaneously Changes Everything

- - Working

Guest post by Scott Pommier

Until recently I had no interest in the convergence of stills and motion. I bought a Canon 5d mark II well after the surge of photographer-made videos, and owned that camera for more than a year before I switched it to video mode. That was at the urging of my agent who had been telling me that it was becoming important to have some examples of moving-image to show clients. I shot one crummy video and went back to using my 35mm film SLR. I’d heard that photographers of the future would be shooting with magical hybrid cameras, but it didn’t seem relevant to my process (my camera of choice when shooting a portrait or a fashion story is still a Pentax 67). I knew that some photographers had been extracting stills from RED footage, but that was all purely academic, something that the Steven Kliens of the world were doing that made little sense for the way that I worked.
 
November of last year a friend let me know that RED was selling off their old Red One cameras at shockingly affordable price. These were cameras that company had taken as traded-in, and they’d been outfitted with a new sensor. Bigger and heavier than RED’s current models but fully capable of shooting a Hollywood feature. It seemed like an amazing opportunity and without nearly enough thought, I launched into a whole new dimension of my career. It’s now been a year since my first small moving-image production, and looking back it’s amazing to see how my mindset and how my way of working has changed. I thought I would share my understanding of what the latest breakthrough in cameras means for me.
 
I was looking to upgrade to a newer cinema camera, having outgrown the Red One. RED had recently announced an entirely new sensor. Current owners of the RED Epic could have their camera-bodies upgraded with the new 6k Dragon sensor (The Dragon camera is also available new, but, well, it’s complicated.

dragon still life 2014

RED has sort of tiered approach to ownership, which is a topic for another day.) I bought a camera from a guy who was already waiting in the upgrade line, he had quite a good spot as it turned out. Overnight I went from being 15-years behind the times to using a camera that only a handful of people in the world had access to.
 
Red has been claiming that their cameras were capable of producing a usable still image for some time now, and to be fair that was sorta’ true. With the best resources it was possible and there are Vogue covers to prove it, but, having pulled stills from both Red One and Epic cameras I have to say, the results were, maybe not underwhelming, but not exactly overwhelming either, maybe just whelming? But for anyone tempted to dismiss the latest hype about the Dragon camera as nothing more than the same predictable public relations blast, I will tell you, for me, this camera changes everything. The Dragon allows you to shoot still images and motion images simultaneously.
 
A few numbers, for the uninitiated: RED’s new Epic ‘Dragon’ is capable of producing 6k files. What that means is that each frame can be up to 19.4 megapixel or 6144 x 3160 which gives you a 20.48” x 10.53” image at 300dpi. The sensor boasts a 16.5 stop dynamic range.  Where the original Epic had a native ISO of 800, the Dragon performs well between 200 and 2000. Less impressive than the latest 35mm DSLRs but far more forgiving than current medium-format offerings (it is worth noting that DSLRs make use of ‘in-camera’ noise reduction, and which still results in significant loss of detail at high ISO settings.)
 
There are all kind of color-charts and controlled tests that plot one camera or film or digital back against another. I leave that kind of testing to people who are a good deal more thorough than I am. But after taking this thing out for a spin the difference was obvious. Shooting under the hot-noon sun yielded very similar results to print film, in terms of color rendering and contrast. There is also a sharp yet smooth quality to the images, like a high-resolution scan of medium-format film. In fact this ‘movie camera’ produces the best digital stills I’ve ever seen. I include in that list the Sony f55, the Arri Alexa, any and all DSLRs, Leica’s M9 and S2, The new Phase One back and even the Hasselblad that looks like a Ferrari, all of them. The Dragon is the first digital camera that has made me hopeful that I will be able to continue shooting images that match the look and feel of my current work even with the impending demise of film.
 
What does this all mean? Potentially it could mean a lot of things. One thing it could mean is that in many cases, photographers could be replaced. Talented DP’s who shoot day-in-day-out, use the sharpest lenses known to man and have a team of people to light a scene, they know how to take pictures, really good pictures. Now extracting those pictures is easier than ever, and the resolution of those pictures is greater than ever. Why bring in a photographer who’s going to disrupt the workflow when you could just reset, quickly change your shutterspeed/ISO (if that’s even necessary.) Imagine a 1st A.D. yelling out “Capturing for print! Okay, moving on.” Scary right?
 
Alternatively… say you’re hired to shoot stills but in addition to the stills you end up with broadcast-quality footage, footage that you could license to the client. Exciting right?
 
It’s what Homer Simpson might call a “crisi-tunity.” You can make of it what you will, but there’s every chance the world will change a little bit, for better or for worse, or perhaps for better and for worse.
 
Thrilled as I am with my new camera and all that it does, I will be the first to tell you that having your still camera wrapped up in a movie camera creates some difficulties. Here are a few things to consider:
 
Cost
Crisis: Expensive, buying the camera is just the start
 
Opportunity: Two cameras for the price of one.  As expensive as the Dragon is, when is the last time Canon or Nikon allowed you to swap out your sensor rather than simply selling you a new camera? Or offered a factory trade-in program? The fact is for a camera that shoots capital M Movies the Dragon comparatively cheap. Red has also kept the same form factor, despite criticisms (believe it or not) that the camera is too small. The advantage there is that accessories carry over between models, even after upgrades. There are also a number of third-party manufacturers such as Wooden Camera that make some very clever and affordable components.
 
Storage
Crisis: You’ll need lots of it, backed up even. See above.
 
Opportunity: N/A
 
Workflow
Crisis: If you like to chimp in the field (you know: shoot, look, shoot, look) it’s not nearly so quick to review footage, especially slow motion to double-check that you’ve got the shot.
 
Opportunity: When you’re editing you have the opportunity to find moments you hadn’t considered during capture. On slow-motion takes you’ll be able to pinpoint the exact timing you’re after. Also, programs like Premiere Pro 6 handle the native RAW files in a really interesting way, allowing your to review and edit the footage at a lower resolution, if you edit at say ¼ resolution, the footage is still sharp (HD sharp actually) but even a laptop is often able to play everything in real time. This is a huge leap forward from the old days of RED footage, the memory of which still haunts a lot of people who will tell you that the post workflow with RED cameras is prohibitively cumbersome. These are the people who thought that Elvis’ pelvic gyrations on the Ed Sullivan show were too obscene for the viewing public. Feel free to ignore these people.
 
Lenses
Crisis: Cinema lenses are expensive and heavy.
 
Opportunity: Interchangeable mounts allow you to use your ‘still’ lenses, also cinema lenses can be incredibly sharp. Also, when collimated the ‘witness marks’ (distance scale) are accurate, so you can measure to ensure focus, or set marks on the lens to track focus on moving subjects. Inferior to tracking autofocus in some ways, better in others.
 
Weight
Crisis: Heavy! Hand holdable, but flying with cinema gear is a drag. Lugging it around a set is a drag.
 
Opportunity: Solidly built, steadier than your 7d footage. The system is modular and can be configured in all kinds of ways, from a fairly portable one all the way to a Hollywood technocrane setup.
 
Learning Curve
Crisis: Lots to learn, from the gear to the workflow, to the jargon.
 
Opportunity: Lots of support to help you learn. Learning is fun. Mashing buttons is learning!
 
The Dragon is just the first of many cameras will further blur the line between still and motion capture. No matter how you feel about that, this is not the time stick your head in the sand, or to wait for the storm to pass, or to hope that the genie will go back in the bottle. Quite the opposite, which I guess means that, it’s time to emerge from the sand during a storm and unleash a genie? What I’m trying to say is that sooner or later this kind of technology will become commonplace, and you should think about what that will mean for how you work and how you market your talents.

Sample Images:

A002_C010_0206TC

A006_C034_0216UT

A005_C007_0320JT

How Should Clients React to Sexual Coercion Allegations Against Terry Richardson?

- - Blog News

…clients aren’t talking at all.

GQ and Harper’s Bazaar, which are two of Richardson’s regular (and most frequent) editorial clients, according to the Jezebel list, didn’t respond to numerous phone calls and e-mails for comment. The Wall Street Journal magazine, which has hired Richardson for several celebrity shoots in recent months, said through spokesperson Arianna Imperato, “We’re going to decline to comment.”

Modeling agencies are also silent. Requests for comment from Wilhelmina, Next, and Muse went unanswered.

via PDNPulse » How Should Clients React to Sexual Coercion Allegations Against Terry Richardson?.