Life.com Launches

- - Magazines

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The new Life.com just launched and it’s worth a visit to go peruse some great old photography. I think they’re planning on simply using it as a portal to sell Getty images, but it’s nice that they put a decent user interface on it and created edited material to check out.

This is from the press release:
“More than 7 million photos from the Life and Getty Images photo collections are now available to consumers in the largest online photography site. The curated site features both rarely seen and iconic photos from the 1850s through today. More than 3,000 new photos from Getty Images award-winning photographers will be added to the site daily.”

There Are 9 Comments On This Article.

  1. Didn’t they previously state is was designed to sell ads? Time Life has been trying for about 15 years to monetize its collection. Here is the culmination of some poor efforts, indicating that it might be easier to make money selling ads than on licensing images. A bunch of people must be getting paid to put this together…. do they do it in between ploughing through Flickr? Help!

  2. This is fun to browse. My mother in law was photo editor for the international edition for 22 years. Too bad she doesn’t have a computer! Love the old Hawaii shots.

  3. Thanks for posting. I love vintage photography. It is my understanding, David Schonauer, Editor in Chief of American Photo Magazine is busily working on editing Life images right now. I am guessing they will feature Life images (and tandem story), as part of an upcoming issue at American Photo Magazine. I suspect it will be an interesting read. FYI

  4. The initial view of the site immediately made me kind of dizzy with all of the thumbnails. I do like the photos of the day, and after navigating through them, the site wasn’t so dizzying. The big Rolex ad is distracting, but, I guess that’s the point since the purpose of an ad is to get your attention.

  5. The LIFE cover you’ve posted is what inspired me to become a photojournalist. At 7-years-old I wasn’t able to actually articulate that. But, I’ve never forgotten Larry Burrows’ work and years later sought out my own copy of that issue as a sort of “oracle.”